Travel with peace of mind: refundable, rebookable, flexible - Learn More 152 Reviews
Travel with peace of mind! Learn More

Why book with us?

Discover Northern Safari Circuit in Tanzania

Refundable, Rebookable, Authentic Tanzania Safari

Refundable, Rebookable, Authentic Safari

Northern Safari Circuit in Tanzania

The northern safari circuit is bookended by Lake Victoria and Rubondo Island in the west and Mount Kilimanjaro in the east. To the north lies the Kenyan border with the Masai Mara and Amboseli reserves located just across the frontier. Tarangire National Park is regarded as the most southerly tourist attraction in this diverse and breathtaking safari region. Within a relatively compact geographical area, safari goers will have access to a multitude of other iconic parks and major tourist attractions, including the Serengeti, Ngorongoro Crater, Oldupai Gorge, Lake Natron, Ol Doinyo Lengai volcano, Mount Meru, Arusha National Park and Lake Manyara.

Oldupai Gorge is an area of geographical importance

Highlights

First-and-foremost amongst a profusion of highlights on the northern safari circuit is the Serengeti National Park, encompassing 14,750 square kilometres and making up 50% of the wider Serengeti-Mara ecosystem, this is an iconic wildlife area. Sensational scenery dominated by expansive savannah grasslands and peppered with distinctive flattop acacias and balanites trees make this one of the most picturesque landscapes in all of Africa. Throw in 1.7 million wildebeest, 300,000 zebra and 400,000 gazelles and you have a wildlife spectacle second to none. Whether your budget stretches to incorporate a visit to the luxurious lodges within the exclusive Singita Grumeti concessions of the western corridor, or is limited to the budget offerings of Ikona Wildlife Management Area, the Serengeti and its surrounding reserves offer safari accommodations and experiences to suit most budgets.

The Great Wildebeest Migration makes its way across the Grumeti every year

Adjoining the south-east of the Serengeti National Park lies the exclusive Legendary Lodges concessions of Mwiba and southern Maswa that wrap around into the extensive Ngorongoro Conservation Area. Most visitors only ever see the Ngorongoro Crater, but if you have your own vehicle you have a unique opportunity to leave the safari hordes behind and explore the wider conservation area that is a mixed-use area for wildlife and Maasai pastoralists. Within this protected area, the vast Oldupai Gorge (originally misnamed Olduvai) is an archaeological site made famous by the Leakey family for being home to some of the continent’s most important hominid fossils. The Ngorongoro scenery is sensational and provided you visit outside of the peak safari season months (June – September) you will fall in love with this attractive crater packed full of habituated wildlife and mesmerizing scenery.

Mount Kilimanjaro is an anomaly. Located virtually on the equator, this 5,885 metre high conical, free-standing volcano seems so out of place with its snow-capped peak dwarfing the rift valley below. Whether you come to Tanzania to climb its legendary slopes to stand atop Uhuru Peak, or simply to gaze and photograph its majesty, as it presides over the plains and parks below, it would be wrong to come to Tanzania and not spend some time appreciating this grand old mountain that forms the roof of Africa.

A lodge overlooks the legendary southern Maswa concession

The plentiful wildlife and giant elephant tuskers of Tarangire National Park, along with the seasonal appearance of upwards of a million flamingos that descend upon shallow Lake Manyara, round out the top five highlights for any safari to the northern circuit.

Practical Advice

Tourist infrastructure is considerably better developed across the northern region with a wide variety of accommodation options from rustic campsites and budget lodgings to boutique camps and exclusive safari lodges that are amongst the very finest in Africa. While many visitors opt to fly between camps to save time, there is an extensive and well-maintained road network that enables relatively easy movement overland, although during the heavy rains from March to May, you should expect bridges and river crossings on the minor roads to periodically become submerged and even collapse after heavy rainfall. Unpaved secondary roads also take a real beating over this period.

An aerial view of Mount Kilimanjaro

Safety is not a major concern in northern Tanzania. The biggest non-weather related challenges you are likely to encounter while travelling through northern Tanzania will be with roadblocks, petty police harassment and traffic fines. Diesel and petrol are both widely available outside of the protected areas, but it is worth stocking up on fuel and supplies in the bigger towns and cities of the region, such as Mwanza, Arusha and Moshi, whenever you are passing through.


How it Works

1 View our recommended safaris for inspiration and get ready to plan your dream safari
2 Contact us or fill out an enquiry form and one of our travel experts will help you tailor make your perfect safari
3 Enjoy an authentic African experience, with peace of mind

Travel with Peace of Mind

Plan your safari with confidence. Refundable deposits and flexible rebooking terms standard on your Tanzania safari.
icon/refundable/policies copy 5
Refundable
icon/refundable/policies copy 4
Rebookable
icon/refundable/policies copy 2
Flexible
icon/refundable/policies copy 6
Authentic

Popular 

Tanzania Safaris

These recommended tours for Tanzania can be tailor-made to match your budget.

When is the best time to travel to Tanzania?

Peak Low Mixed
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

Tanzania in January

Tanzania experiences two rainy seasons and two dry seasons: the short dry season runs from late January to early March, and the long dry season from June to October. In between are the short rains of November to January and long rains from late March to May with April being an extremely wet and challenging month to get around. The country’s parks and attractions are at their busiest during the long dry season months of June to September with July and August (European and American…

Tanzania in January

Tanzania experiences two rainy seasons and two dry seasons: the short dry season runs from late January to early March, and the long dry season from June to October. In between are the short rains of November to January and long rains from late March to May with April being an extremely wet and challenging month to get around.

The dry season in Tanzania runs from June to October

The country’s parks and attractions are at their busiest during the long dry season months of June to September with July and August (European and American summer holidays) being the most hectic. The shoulder season months of May and October/November, as well as the short dry season in February and early March, offer exciting alternatives and are recommended times to explore Tanzania.

Tanzania in January is generally a busy time for the game parks

Many visitors to Tanzania want to coincide their visit with seeing the migration, but it is worth noting that you can view the migration during any month of the year – you just need to travel to the appropriate area within the greater Serengeti ecosystem to find the wildebeest herds.

January marks the end of the short rains and tends to be quite green and wet. The lush, green vegetation looks fantastic at this time of year with migrant birds bolstering resident populations. January is a good month for ornithologists, as well as those safari goers who place scenery and solitude over wildlife abundance and safari companionship. For the migration, head to the southern plains of the Serengeti to coincide with the wildebeest calving season.

January is calving season in Tanzania

Tanzania in February

The rains depends on your chosen location in Tanzania, while the northern parks are more likely to see dry spells, while the western parks remain rather wet throughout. February is definitely the best time of year to see wildebeest calves, with the migratory herds in full calving season. This usually happens in Ndutu in the southern part of the Serengeti where millions of wildebeest congregate to feed on the grasses and give birth to their calves. Around 500,000 wildebeest calves are…

Tanzania in February

The rains depends on your chosen location in Tanzania, while the northern parks are more likely to see dry spells, while the western parks remain rather wet throughout.

February in Tanzania sees thousands of calves being born in close succession

February is definitely the best time of year to see wildebeest calves, with the migratory herds in full calving season. This usually happens in Ndutu in the southern part of the Serengeti where millions of wildebeest congregate to feed on the grasses and give birth to their calves. Around 500,000 wildebeest calves are born over a short period. This makes for a great sight on safari, perhaps glimpsing their first teetering steps in their new habitat.

Predators are always close by during the calving season

With the advent of the calves, the predators would be lurking in the nearby thrush for the next opportunity.

While rainfall can be difficult to predict from year-to-year, February is typically a great month to visit Tanzania, as it coincides with the short dry season. Getting around the country and its protected areas is easier during the drier months and there is still good colour in the bush. Both birding and wildlife viewing tend to be excellent during this month.

Wildebeest migratory herds crossing a river is a sight to behold

Tanzania in March

The Ngorongoro Highlands receive short and sharp rainfall in the late afternoon, leaving the mornings pleasant and generally dry for excellent game viewing. Early March tends to be dry, although in some years the rains have been known to return early, so it can be wet. That said, seeing the bush turn from a tawny brown to green is a mesmerising sight in its own right. Also, with this being the start of the main rainy season it is unlikely that you would encounter enough rain to ruin…

Tanzania in March

The Ngorongoro Highlands receive short and sharp rainfall in the late afternoon, leaving the mornings pleasant and generally dry for excellent game viewing.

Ngorongoro Highlands

Early March tends to be dry, although in some years the rains have been known to return early, so it can be wet. That said, seeing the bush turn from a tawny brown to green is a mesmerising sight in its own right. Also, with this being the start of the main rainy season it is unlikely that you would encounter enough rain to ruin your safari experience or to limit your mobility within the country to see and explore all the varied attractions.

Rhino in the sweeping valley of Ngorongoro

March (along with September/October) are considered the prime months for those wishing to tackle Kilimanjaro. During unforseen rainy seasons, some roads may become inaccessible, so it’s best to chat to one of our Tanzanian travel consultants to get real-time information regarding the weather patterns.

An elephant in its natural habitat

Tanzania in April

If there is one month that is probably worth avoiding for a visit to Tanzania, then that would have to be the rain-soaked month of April. This is by far the wettest month of the year, as it falls in the midst of the long/heavy rains. While the rains predominantly come in the form of afternoon thunderstorms, it is not unusual to have big storms at night as well as some grey, drizzly days. Western and Southern parks have the highest humidity during the rainy season so they can become…

Tanzania in April

If there is one month that is probably worth avoiding for a visit to Tanzania, then that would have to be the rain-soaked month of April. This is by far the wettest month of the year, as it falls in the midst of the long/heavy rains. While the rains predominantly come in the form of afternoon thunderstorms, it is not unusual to have big storms at night as well as some grey, drizzly days.

Western and Southern parks have the highest humidity during the rainy season so they can become uncomfortable, although the chances of these hotels and lodges offering good discounts due to the unfavourable climate, is very good. Accommodation such as the Ngorongoro Crater Lodge is also almost half price during this season so you can great value for money if you choose to travel at this time.

Wild dog in the Serengeti

In good rainfall years, you should expect many minor roads to become impassable, river crossings to be submerged and even bridges to wash away. Only the most hardened and experienced 4x4 drivers should attempt to tackle the muddy and rutted roads that predominate throughout the wilder areas of Tanzania during April.

Roads in April can be very treacherous and are not for the faint of heart

Tanzania in May

Early May is usually still very wet but, as the month progresses, things start to dry out and road repairs get underway, making moving around the parks and country by vehicle easier over time. The bush and vegetation look fantastic after all the rain with most herbivores in fine condition thanks to the abundant food and water that’s widely available. The eastern region of Tanzania remains rather budget-friendly before the start of the main dry season. If you are fortunate you will…

Tanzania in May

Early May is usually still very wet but, as the month progresses, things start to dry out and road repairs get underway, making moving around the parks and country by vehicle easier over time. The bush and vegetation look fantastic after all the rain with most herbivores in fine condition thanks to the abundant food and water that’s widely available.

Lake Manyara is lush and green this time of the year

The eastern region of Tanzania remains rather budget-friendly before the start of the main dry season. If you are fortunate you will enjoy a few consecutive days of sunshine, but with nature nothing is guaranteed.

At this time of year, long columns of wildebeest vacate the short grass plains of the southern Serengeti and start to trek north and into the western corridor. The latter part of May is a great time to be in Tanzania: the emerald season is giving way to the early dry season, wildebeest are on the move, the tourist hordes are yet to arrive, and everywhere the bush looks lush and colourful. May is consequently a great month for photographers.

May is a mecca for photographers

Tanzania in June

June is dry and busy. Peak season is underway and areas like the western Serengeti are extremely popular at this time of year with the wildebeest piling into the western corridor in their hundreds of thousands. With the rains properly finished, the savannahs are already starting to change from green to yellow and wildlife sightings are constantly improving as the vegetation slowly recedes. The wildebeest herds stop at Grumeti River to build up numbers before they attempt the river…

Tanzania in June

June is dry and busy. Peak season is underway and areas like the western Serengeti are extremely popular at this time of year with the wildebeest piling into the western corridor in their hundreds of thousands. With the rains properly finished, the savannahs are already starting to change from green to yellow and wildlife sightings are constantly improving as the vegetation slowly recedes.

Wildebeest are in their numbers this time of the year

The wildebeest herds stop at Grumeti River to build up numbers before they attempt the river crossing in their thousands. Many traverse the river successfully because of safety in numbers. If however you’re in the right place at the right time you may spot a crocodile attempting to take down a wildebeest.

June is possibly the best time of the year to visit the Serengeti because of the amazing wildlife viewing - with the best sights to be seen in the northernmost parts.

Few things rival african sunsets

Tanzania in July

The safari season is in full swing and Tanzania is dry with a good chance of roads kicking up dust clouds when driving through the plains. Tanzania is busy during July, expect to find all the parks and prime attractions of the northern circuit to be crowded during the months of July and August. If you are planning a sojourn to Zanzibar, then it is also worth exploring options for other less frequented Indian Ocean islands, such as Pemba and Mafia islands, at this time of…

Tanzania in July

The safari season is in full swing and Tanzania is dry with a good chance of roads kicking up dust clouds when driving through the plains. Tanzania is busy during July, expect to find all the parks and prime attractions of the northern circuit to be crowded during the months of July and August. If you are planning a sojourn to Zanzibar, then it is also worth exploring options for other less frequented Indian Ocean islands, such as Pemba and Mafia islands, at this time of year.

Pemba Island is part of the Zanzibar archipelago

Wildlife viewing is excellent in July and is well worth putting up with the crowds if you’re comfortable doing so. It is also worth remembering that the southern safari circuit is a viable and recommended alternative that would give you the best of both worlds: less visitors and good wildlife sightings.

Wildebeest and zebra can be seen in large numbers in Tanzania this time of the year

Tanzania in August

August is still very much peak season with large numbers of visitors from America and Europe dominating the northern safari circuit and Zanzibar. The weather is excellent at this time of year, although it can get a bit windy in August and wild fires are a common sight sweeping through the dry grasslands. Expect hazy conditions that detract from the scenic beauty, obscure the majesty of the landscapes, and make photography more challenging, but on the flipside the wildlife viewing is…

Tanzania in August

August is still very much peak season with large numbers of visitors from America and Europe dominating the northern safari circuit and Zanzibar. The weather is excellent at this time of year, although it can get a bit windy in August and wild fires are a common sight sweeping through the dry grasslands.

A lone cheetah waits patiently in the dry grasslands

Expect hazy conditions that detract from the scenic beauty, obscure the majesty of the landscapes, and make photography more challenging, but on the flipside the wildlife viewing is sensational. The migration has moved north by now into the Lamai region of the northern Serengeti as the wildebeest and zebra start to cross the Mara River.

The Mara River crossing is a spectacular sight

Tarangire National Park is excellent for spotting elephants who roam freely among the open plains.

The great wildebeest

Tanzania in September

Visitor numbers are starting to drop off now; there is still no rain in sight, meaning that humidity levels are low bringing fewer mosquitoes. The landscapes have turned brown and grass/food is scarce. The migration concentrates along the perennial Mara River with huge columns of wildebeest and zebra crossing in both directions as the animals search for grazing while staying close to the water. The Lamai-Mara region remains busy, as does Kilimanjaro (September is regarded by those in…

Tanzania in September

Visitor numbers are starting to drop off now; there is still no rain in sight, meaning that humidity levels are low bringing fewer mosquitoes. The landscapes have turned brown and grass/food is scarce. The migration concentrates along the perennial Mara River with huge columns of wildebeest and zebra crossing in both directions as the animals search for grazing while staying close to the water.

Hoards of wildebeest cross the Mara river in September

The Lamai-Mara region remains busy, as does Kilimanjaro (September is regarded by those in the know as the optimal month to climb), but the rest of Tanzania’s tourist attractions and parks are starting to see a drop off in visitor numbers, as they regain their wilderness feel. The southern safari circuit remains blissfully wild, beckoning those with a sense of adventure and yearning for wilderness.

September is an excellent time of year to climb Mt. Kili

September also sees the start of the fishing season in Tanzania’s great lake regions for all the avid anglers who’d like to combine their safari experience with fishing.

Anglers will love the fishing safaris on offer

Tanzania in October

The thunderclouds are building and late October usually sees the arrival of the first rains. The wildebeest are heading south again; Kilimanjaro climbing remains popular throughout October; and wildlife viewing is superb with little vegetation to obscure the high quality sightings. Tourist numbers are considerably lower over this shoulder season period, rendering the most popular tourist attractions a more appealing proposition once more. Mahale Mountains National Park is fully…

Tanzania in October

The thunderclouds are building and late October usually sees the arrival of the first rains. The wildebeest are heading south again; Kilimanjaro climbing remains popular throughout October; and wildlife viewing is superb with little vegetation to obscure the high quality sightings. Tourist numbers are considerably lower over this shoulder season period, rendering the most popular tourist attractions a more appealing proposition once more.

A lone lionness waits patiently beneath an Acacia tree in Tanzania

Mahale Mountains National Park is fully accessible this time of the year, making chimpanzee spotting prime. Lake Tanganyika is also at its warmest this time of year.

Gorgeous chimps hang around in Mahale Mountains NP

Make the most of the dried up landscapes, as well as seasonal lakes and rivers in Katavi before the rainy season starts in November.

The Katavi region is aa pristine wilderness destination in Tanzania

Most of the wildlife will gather close to the Katuma River giving the chance to see a selection of wildlife in a small location. This national park also offers spectacular elephant viewing in the open plains where large groups gather creating a fascinating atmosphere.

October is the best time to visit Arusha National Park and if you want to, climb Mount Meru. Having said that, spotting wildlife this time of the year is not as highly revered, but you may still sight hyenas and leopards in the early morning and evening.

Tanzania in November

This is one of the most underrated months to go on safari in Tanzania. You will definitely have some rain to contend with, but it is usually in the form of periodic afternoon thundershowers. The northern parks in general are great for game year-round and although the Serengeti receives rain, this means that the wildebeest will be moving south across the plains to make the most of this moisture. If they have not already arrived from Kenya, they will do by November. Roads remain…

Tanzania in November

This is one of the most underrated months to go on safari in Tanzania. You will definitely have some rain to contend with, but it is usually in the form of periodic afternoon thundershowers.

Wildlife at a waterhole in Tanzania

The northern parks in general are great for game year-round and although the Serengeti receives rain, this means that the wildebeest will be moving south across the plains to make the most of this moisture. If they have not already arrived from Kenya, they will do by November.

Hot air ballooning over the Serengeti can give you a new perspective

Roads remain open and rivers low, so exploring off-the-beaten-track destinations and getting around is still relatively straightforward even as the landscape transforms from desolate brown to lush green before you eyes. The wide-open plains take on the appearance of a golf course with short grass that adds colour without obscuring wildlife sightings. With billowing cumulus clouds and the smoke and dust washed away, this is once again a great month for photography.

Tarangire National Park starts heating up from November onwards and can get rather humid with the start of the summer rain season.

Tarangire National Park in Tanzania is a major attraction

Tanzania in December

December falls in the midst of the short rains so except some rain and wet weather. Tourist numbers are low for the first half of the month, but for two weeks over Christmas and New Year everything is choc-a-block, so it’s best to avoid the last-minute rush and book well in advance. December is a great time for bird watchers as many migratory birds arrive. This is particularly good in southern parks such as Selous and Tarangire National Park in the north is a birdwatchers’…

Tanzania in December

December falls in the midst of the short rains so except some rain and wet weather. Tourist numbers are low for the first half of the month, but for two weeks over Christmas and New Year everything is choc-a-block, so it’s best to avoid the last-minute rush and book well in advance.

An elephant in Tanzania strikes an impressive contrast against the landscape

December is a great time for bird watchers as many migratory birds arrive. This is particularly good in southern parks such as Selous and Tarangire National Park in the north is a birdwatchers’ paradise. Look out for red-necked spurfowl, purple grenadier and cinnamon-breasted buntings to name just a few.

Grey crowned crane is a common sight in Tanzania

By now the migrant birds have arrived in full force, which makes for some superb birding opportunities. The wildebeest have returned to the short grass plains of the southern Serengeti to calve. With their more limited infrastructure, the wild parks of the southern safari circuit become more challenging during December and for the duration of the wet season.

Yellow berbet

Our Recommended

Tours in Tanzania

These recommended tours for Tanzania can be tailor-made to match your budget.

Our Destination Expert

Alice Lombard Alice Lombard Alice Lombard Alice Lombard Alice Lombard Alice Lombard

Meet the Team

Alice Lombard

Alice is Discover Africa’s Sales & Product Manager, responsible for managing the Discover Africa Sales Consultants as well as all the products and itineraries that we promote.

About Alice

What does Alice love about African travel?

The people, the culture, the diverse scenery, the wildlife and of course the food & wine.

What African countries have you travelled to?

Zimbabwe (Victoria Falls), Botswana (Okavango Delta, Linyanti, Chobe), Namibia (Southern), Zanzibar, Kenya (Mombasa and Malindi), Mauritius and South Africa.

What is Alice’s favourite place in Africa?

Victoria Falls and Cape Town.

Contact Discover Africa

Send us a message, to ask any questions, or request a tailor-made safari or experience.

Call Discover Africa on +27 (0)21 422 3498

Get in touch to find out more about the tours on offer or request a personalized no-obligations quote.

Megan Warrington Megan Warrington Megan Warrington Megan Warrington Megan Warrington Megan Warrington

Meet the Team

Megan Warrington

Megan is an Africa Concierge Expert at Discover Africa, she is responsible for compiling travel programs for people in search of their dream safari in Africa.

About Megan

What does Megan love about African travel?

There is always a new adventure around the next corner.

What African countries have you travelled to?

South Africa, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Lesotho, Botswana and Tanzania.

What is Megan’s favourite place in Africa?

Namibia

Contact Discover Africa

Send us a message, to ask any questions, or request a tailor-made safari or experience.

Call Discover Africa on +27 (0)21 422 3498

Get in touch to find out more about the tours on offer or request a personalized no-obligations quote.

Alice Lombard Alice Lombard Alice Lombard Alice Lombard Alice Lombard Alice Lombard

Meet the Team

Alice Lombard

Alice is Discover Africa’s Sales & Product Manager, responsible for managing the Discover Africa Sales Consultants as well as all the products and itineraries that we promote.

About Alice

What does Alice love about African travel?

The people, the culture, the diverse scenery, the wildlife and of course the food & wine.

What African countries have you travelled to?

Zimbabwe (Victoria Falls), Botswana (Okavango Delta, Linyanti, Chobe), Namibia (Southern), Zanzibar, Kenya (Mombasa and Malindi), Mauritius and South Africa.

What is Alice’s favourite place in Africa?

Victoria Falls and Cape Town.

Contact Discover Africa

Send us a message, to ask any questions, or request a tailor-made safari or experience.

Call Discover Africa on +27 (0)21 422 3498

Get in touch to find out more about the tours on offer or request a personalized no-obligations quote.

Matthys van Aswegen Matthys van Aswegen Matthys van Aswegen Matthys van Aswegen Matthys van Aswegen Matthys van Aswegen

Meet the Team

Matthys van Aswegen

Matthys is Discover Africa’s Senior Travel Consultant, with over 13 years experience in the travel industry and a keen eye for photography.

About Matthys

What does Matthys love about African travel?

Diversity and abundance of landscapes, cultures, wildlife, beaches, food and everything you can think of.

What African countries have you travelled to?

South Africa, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mauritius and Tanzania.

What is Matthys’s favourite place in Africa?

Cape Town

Contact Discover Africa

Send us a message, to ask any questions, or request a tailor-made safari or experience.

Call Discover Africa on +27 (0)21 422 3498

Get in touch to find out more about the tours on offer or request a personalized no-obligations quote.

Adelle Bell Adelle Bell Adelle Bell Adelle Bell Adelle Bell Adelle Bell

Meet the Team

Adelle Bell

Adelle is Discover Africa’s Senior Travel Consultant and has been in the travel industry for the past 10 years. She is a FIT specialist and has extensive experience in planning and executing dream itineraries in luxury travel.

About Adelle

What does Adelle love about African travel?

You have not lived if you have not experienced an African Safari - the early morning safari drives with the African sun rising in the distance, the smell of morning freshness, coffee in the Bush. You have got to experience a morning in Africa!

What African countries have you travelled to?

South Africa (Kruger National Park, Sabi Sands and Phinda Game Reserve), Botswana and Mozambique.

What is Adelle’s favourite place in Africa?

Kruger National Park

Contact Discover Africa

Send us a message, to ask any questions, or request a tailor-made safari or experience.

Call Discover Africa on +27 (0)21 422 3498

Get in touch to find out more about the tours on offer or request a personalized no-obligations quote.

Antoinette Van Heerden Antoinette Van Heerden Antoinette Van Heerden Antoinette Van Heerden Antoinette Van Heerden Antoinette Van Heerden

Meet the Team

Antoinette Van Heerden

Antionette is a Travel Consultant at Discover Africa, with 5 + years experience in the travel and tourism industry. She specializes in luxury safari packages.

About Antoinette

What does Antoinette love about African travel?

Adventure combined leisure travel makes for the best trip!

What African countries have you travelled to?

South Africa, Botswana, Namibia and Zimbabwe.

What is Antoinette’s favourite place in Africa?

South Africa, Botswana and Namibia.

Contact Discover Africa

Send us a message, to ask any questions, or request a tailor-made safari or experience.

Call Discover Africa on +27 (0)21 422 3498

Get in touch to find out more about the tours on offer or request a personalized no-obligations quote.

A gem

Jacob Weiss

11 Nov 2019

Thank you Ellena for your professional service

Dirk Van Den Berg

01 Feb 2013

Fantastic safari, excellent logistics and service for a fair price

Francisco

05 Jul 2018

You can book your African holiday in full confidence with discover Africa

Family Olivier

10 Oct 2018

Superb service!

Julia

23 Dec 2015

Your services are 10 / 10

Mokatse Itumeleng

01 Sep 2013

Way above our expectations and we felt sad to leave!

Sushila Sivaretnam

21 May 2019

Serenity in Kenya

Cheryl

07 Jan 2020

Wow! Awesome service and a tour to match.

Sue

16 Oct 2018

They make it happen!

Rosie Rozain

20 Apr 2018

I'll never travel without an agent again

Sarah Kirkpatrick

20 Feb 2020

Registered Members of these Organizations