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Discover Central and Eastern Etosha

Refundable, Rebookable, Authentic Etosha Safari

Refundable, Rebookable, Authentic Safari

Central and Eastern Etosha

Welcome to the best-known part of Etosha: The expanse of land fringing the eastern and southern rim of the enormous depression that is the ancient salt pan itself. Nothing grows in the salty, lime-rich pan except algae, but it and other smaller pans such as Okahakana are surrounded by grassland, mopane shrublands, and some woodland, and the area sustains a remarkable variety of life. Of the Big Five, only buffalo don’t reside here – and that is more than made up for by exceptional sightings of black rhino, seldom seen in most other safari destinations. The park’s 300-odd lion (the country’s core population) are relaxed around vehicles and one study noted density was quite high, at 1.8 lions per 100km2. Slinky, secretive leopards are of course harder to see but certain waterholes are known to have a resident spotted cat.

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Most visitors will drive to Etosha from the capital, Windhoek. It’s 430-odd kilometres up routes B1 and C38, an easy trip that takes around five hours. A quick orientation tour is helpful. Visitors will enter this section of the park through either the southern Andersson Gate, or Von Lindequist Gate in the east. A little further north is King Nehale Lya Mpingana Gate, for those coming down from the Caprivi region, now called Zambezi. Camps in this region are the older, government-run classics, renovated about a decade ago: Namutoni, found inside the eastern border of the park, Halali, situated south of Etosha Pan, and Okaukuejo, near the pan’s eastern tip. All will suit couples, solo travellers and families happy with budget accommodations (although they are not dirt cheap). Guided game drives are on offer at all camps, morning, afternoon and night. The C38 through the park links all three camps, and tempting loop roads slip off to waterholes along the way. The names themselves are a delight, hinting at the essence of the place and the cultures that have lived here: Okaukuejo, for example, means the woman who had a child every year; the tongue-twisting Omumborombonga means leadwood tree, protected hardwoods that are rare in Namibia and grow at this pan; and Tgumses translates as “the soil deep in the hole is always wet”.

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It is worth remembering that Etosha really is an arid place, a harsh landscape that some might find unforgiving. Towards the end of dry season, grazing around waterholes is depleted and hooves clatter on stones as animals come down to drink. It is quite primordial in ways; but foregrounds the natural cycles that allows life to flourish even in tough places like this.

As game tends to migrate east when the rains come, the Namutoni area is a good option. It is also near Fischer’s Pan, a hotspot for migrant waterbirds – blushing pink flamingos! – in rainy season, as well as cheetah. Pretty makalani palms sway around waterholes on this side of the park. An NWR ranger born in Namutoni recommends the Sandveld north of the camp for big herds of elephant and that giant among antelope, the eland. The few white rhino in the park (reintroduced in 1995) liked the area between Namutoni and Halali at one stage; look for them near the Springbokfontein waterhole. The old fort at Namutoni is a remarkable sight in the desert surrounds. It was virtually obliterated by Owambo warriors at the turn of the 20th century, but rebuilt within a couple of years. At all three classic camps one can stay in chalets (some family chalets have a kitchenette but most chalets aren’t fully self-catering), double rooms (in blocks of four) or the campsite, and there is a restaurant, shop with basic supplies, a pool and fuel.

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Halali, opened in 1967, has the same basic amenities and accommodations as Namutoni although it’s slightly smaller, and it too has a floodlit waterhole, more frequented by the coveted black rhino than Namutoni’s. It’s usefully situated, has an attractive setting below a hill, and boasts the odd honeymoon suite and a busy pool. The birding in camp is excellent.

Okaukuejo, opened in 1955, is the park’s oldest and largest camp and its large, floodlit waterhole is legendary (as a result, you may be elbow to elbow with others on the viewing stands, waiting for a black rhino to trundle down to drink: it’s the best place in Africa for these volatile creatures). The few waterhole rooms which overlook this prime territory are what to book if you’re ever lucky enough to get a slot! The camp is close to Andersson Gate and the waterholes in the area are extremely popular. The grassy stretches west of Okaukuejo attract game in large numbers after the rains, and are a calving hotspot.

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The best accommodations in this region of the park are at Onkoshi (opened in 2008), the newer solar-powered “luxury eco-camp” north of Namutoni, although you will have to eat at the restaurant and there is no waterhole here, so game is scarcer in winter. It is more intimate, with only 15 chalets on raised wooden decks, an infinity pool and vast vistas. Only lodge guests can access the area; no self-driving visitors, so there is more peace as well as space, although prices of course beat the classic camps. Wildlife photographers and co-authors of The Photographer’s Guide to Etosha National Park, Mario and Jenny Fazekas cite this as their favourite camp for its photo opportunities. “The camp faces west and is situated right on the edge of the salt pan so when the sun sets you get magnificent landscape images of the sun reflecting off the water and silhouettes of flamingos, pelicans and other waterbirds,” they say. “The best time would be after the rains, but some years the pan still has water even in the middle of winter.” This camp will suit couples and solo travellers with a little more to spend. Young children and decks don’t go together.

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One note on the area overall: there are reports that the park’s picnic sites and toilets are sadly neglected. Also, it’s not an exclusive luxury experience, aside from the quality of the game viewing! Visitor numbers have surged and overland trucks and tour buses, never mind numerous day visitors and tours, are a feature. Those who want good service, more attentive staff and an exclusive experience should opt to stay outside the park.

The Perfect Pan

Many of the area’s waterholes have a distinct character and are known for particular sightings; some even have ‘resident’ leopards (although never trust a guide who promises a leopard sighting; they can’t be guaranteed). Etosha’s game is used to traffic. Pure bliss is finding a quiet spot to sit and listen and watch and wait for action, be it zebra jostling for a drink, streams of gorgeous sandgrouse flying in as black-backed jackals try and snap them from the air, or sudden drama as elephant arrive in rumbling groups to slack their thirst. Anja Denker, a Namibian wildlife photographer who has visited the park six times in 2018 alone, cites one of her favourite waterholes as Salvadora, which has views stretching over the water to the horizon and the white mud that elephants coat themselves in. “Salvadora’s backdrop makes for great photography and is always good for spotting lion prides, cheetahs, hyena and a variety of antelope that frequent the surrounding grassland, all year round,” Denke says. She also rates Chudob, near Namutoni “for the sheer variety of game that congregates there, especially in the dry season” (it’s also wonderful for giraffe drinking, legs splayed wide). Nebrownii is excellent for ghost-white elephant – and lion. Halali and Goas have reputations for leopard, as does Rietfontein, which is also a lion hang-out. Fischer pan is marvellous when covered in flamingos.

enter image description here Credit: Namibia Tourism Board

The Etosha Viewpoint

North of Halali camp and very close to Nuames Waterhole is a causeway that takes one out onto the crazy paving cracked white mud of Etosha Pan itself (generally one can’t drive on the pan surface). It’s the closest most of us will get to a lunar landscape. Mirages can turn the horizon to static and it is a good place to feel the immensity and age of the pan: 100-million years old, once a massive lake fed by the Kunene River, which – inexplicably – changed course in some ancient tragedy. PS: It can get mushy after rains when the road is closed; this is a dry season activity.

A Nest that’s a City

Look out for the remarkable structures built by sociable weavers (Philetairus socius). The name rather gives it away: these rather ordinary-looking birds know how to build a community. Their enormous compound nest – the largest in the world – is crammed with independent chambers for young families, and a handful of neighbours help to feed any chicks. Birdlife calls them “ecological engineers” as the nests are used by other species, often in ways we are yet to fully understand. A good spot to start looking for them is in Okaukuejo rest camp, although nests will weigh down bigger trees across the park. Pygmy falcons are associated with the nests too.

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A Fairy Tale Forest

It’s the driest, least crowded “forest” you’re likely to see, but Sprookjeswoud, about 30 kilometres west of Okuakuejo on the road to Grunewald waterhole, is otherworldly. It means ghost or phantom forest, and contains some gnarled African moringa trees (Moringa ovalifolia), standing like lumpy figures in the bright light. The San used to say the trees were thrown from heaven in anger and landed upside down (they have something a little baobab-like about them, with sparse leaves, but are not related).

The Perfect Shot Mirages, Zebra Stripes, Water, Sky

Etosha is a photographer’s dream, especially as animals obligingly trot down to waterholes in winter. Photographer Anja Denker says that Etosha is a challenge due to the harsh light that reflects off the predominantly white soil and surface of the pan. “The best light is in the early morning and late afternoon, with spectacular sunrises and sunsets to boot. It’s best to bring a long telephoto lens as sightings might be a fair distance away, and a wide angle to capture the landscape or the magnitude of game which frequents the waterholes.” Mario and Jenny Fazekas, authors of The Photographer’s Guide to Etosha National Park agree that “a telephoto lens is critical.” They also suggest familiarising oneself with one’s equipment before the trip – they were once shooting a leopard at the floodlit Moringa waterhole at Halali and a hapless guest baffled by her camera settings interrupted, asking them to take a shot for her!

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Practical Advice
  • Etosha is Namibia’s flagship park and so popular that it can be difficult to find room to stay in the government-run camps. Book well in advance.
  • Etosha is enormous and distances extremely deceptive, especially if the 60km/h speed limit is taken into consideration (sadly, not everyone complies). It is larger than South Africa’s Kruger National Park and driving just from Von Lindequist Gate to Okaukuejo, for example, is a hefty 140km that averages 4.5 hours.
  • Guests must check in at Namutoni or Okaukuejo upon arrival.
  • Children are welcome at the classic camps; no children under six at Onkoshi.
  • One can book guided game drives – including at night when visitors may not drive themselves. An excellent way to see the after-dark species.
  • The classic camps usually have mobile phone reception.
  • Self-driving photographers may find a copy of The Photographer’s Guide to Etosha useful; it has information on where to park, best light, and what action can be expected or hoped for at various waterholes.

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Etosha National Park Safaris

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When is the best time to travel to Etosha National Park?

Peak Low Mixed
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

Etosha in January

Mokuti Etosha Lodge Average temperatures hit a sticky 34°C. It’s rainy season: incredibly for a place one thinks of as arid, this can mean mud in patches! A 4x4 will be useful and comfortable, but it is a lot more costly, and the majority of Etosha’s roads remain accessible in an ordinary city car. Park authorities also tend to temporarily close roads that will be a problem. The weather is simply unpredictable: there can be clear sunny skies, but Etosha can also be overcast for…

Etosha in January

mokuti etosha lodge Mokuti Etosha Lodge

Average temperatures hit a sticky 34°C. It’s rainy season: incredibly for a place one thinks of as arid, this can mean mud in patches! A 4x4 will be useful and comfortable, but it is a lot more costly, and the majority of Etosha’s roads remain accessible in an ordinary city car. Park authorities also tend to temporarily close roads that will be a problem. The weather is simply unpredictable: there can be clear sunny skies, but Etosha can also be overcast for days at a time, with the chance of some quite heavy rain. As such, potentially not the best time for photography, although there may be dramatic skies and sunsets thanks to thunderstorms. The beginning of January is still peak local holiday travel time, so the park will be packed. Things quieten down drastically later; by month-end some private lodges can even feel a bit echoey! All the more attention for those lucky few. If the rains have been good, there will be water in the pan itself, and Fisher’s Pan near Namutoni could have turned pink with flamingos, which breed here in good years. Those charismatic big guys, the elephant and rhino, will have gone walkabout toward the east, i.e. moved from the waterholes to thicker bush. As the park roads tend to link waterholes, this can make sightings less accessible.’

etosha national park safari

Etosha in February

The peak of the rainy season. Vegetation will be as lush as it gets in Etosha for the next month or two – which makes game viewing more challenging. If the rains have been good, there will be water in the pan itself (and migrant waterbirds); Fisher’s Pan near Namutoni could have turned pink with flamingos. All the details mentioned for January still apply in terms of the desirability of a 4x4, thunderstorms and potentially, patches of dodgy weather. Elephant and rhino will be more…

Etosha in February

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The peak of the rainy season. Vegetation will be as lush as it gets in Etosha for the next month or two – which makes game viewing more challenging. If the rains have been good, there will be water in the pan itself (and migrant waterbirds); Fisher’s Pan near Namutoni could have turned pink with flamingos. All the details mentioned for January still apply in terms of the desirability of a 4x4, thunderstorms and potentially, patches of dodgy weather. Elephant and rhino will be more elusive, feeding in thicker bush while they have the chance to be further from the waterholes. Heavy showers can cause dry riverbeds to suddenly flow, although it’s usually over in a matter of hours rather than days. The park has lower visitor numbers, which some find a great boon, but experts actually tend to tell first-time visitors in search of big-game drama that this isn’t the best time for Etosha. That said, this is a fenced park (although bigger than the US state of New Jersey), and the animals move around within it: they are there; one just needs more time to get lucky. The Namutoni area (and the east in general) can be more productive.

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Etosha in March

There still a chance of rain and the bush is thick and green and grasses tall… all very lovely, but it does make spotting animals that little bit more difficult! Not many people around, but as per February, not as much big game either, or not lolling around the waterholes waiting to be photographed. Our travel experts say this is a time for more seasoned travellers, rather than those with just one chance to tick Etosha off their bucket list. The game, however, is there, but as…

Etosha in March

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There still a chance of rain and the bush is thick and green and grasses tall… all very lovely, but it does make spotting animals that little bit more difficult! Not many people around, but as per February, not as much big game either, or not lolling around the waterholes waiting to be photographed. Our travel experts say this is a time for more seasoned travellers, rather than those with just one chance to tick Etosha off their bucket list. The game, however, is there, but as always, it’s a bit of a lottery as Tripadvisor notice boards can relate. People have reported superb sightings in March.

Etosha in April

Still nice and quiet in beautiful Etosha, although there will be a spike in tourists around Easter, when rest camps will fill up. The seasons are changing, evenings and early mornings may be cooling down by the end of the month. A less predictable ‘shoulder season’ month, but often very good for Etosha. The herds should have started to move back towards the central areas by the end of the month, but this is still not prime game-viewing-at-waterholes season; driving around will be needed.

Etosha in April

Still nice and quiet in beautiful Etosha, although there will be a spike in tourists around Easter, when rest camps will fill up. The seasons are changing, evenings and early mornings may be cooling down by the end of the month. A less predictable ‘shoulder season’ month, but often very good for Etosha. The herds should have started to move back towards the central areas by the end of the month, but this is still not prime game-viewing-at-waterholes season; driving around will be needed.

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Etosha in May

The land is drying out and long, warm sunny days will start turning the bush a million shades of brown. Average high temperatures are a delicious 29° Centigrade, with lows of 11°C. As things dry out, waterholes become the place to be once again, making it possible to pull up near one and see all sorts of action. By the end of this month, elephants are likely to be heading back to the central /southern areas of the park. It is still not prime holiday time for locals or international,…

Etosha in May

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The land is drying out and long, warm sunny days will start turning the bush a million shades of brown. Average high temperatures are a delicious 29° Centigrade, with lows of 11°C. As things dry out, waterholes become the place to be once again, making it possible to pull up near one and see all sorts of action. By the end of this month, elephants are likely to be heading back to the central /southern areas of the park. It is still not prime holiday time for locals or international, so tourist numbers are low to moderate. A wonderful time to visit the south and east areas.

Etosha in June

Good sunny weather this month, with highs of 27°C and lows a surprisingly chilly 6°C. The dry season starts in earnest. Most of the park is considered to have good game viewing potential and visitor numbers are moderate. It’s the beginning of high season, and by the end of the month, pretty busy. The waterholes will be delivering the goods: lovely tableaux of species can gather at one hole. The elephant will be back at the waterholes, barging in as and when they please.

Etosha in June

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Good sunny weather this month, with highs of 27°C and lows a surprisingly chilly 6°C. The dry season starts in earnest. Most of the park is considered to have good game viewing potential and visitor numbers are moderate. It’s the beginning of high season, and by the end of the month, pretty busy. The waterholes will be delivering the goods: lovely tableaux of species can gather at one hole. The elephant will be back at the waterholes, barging in as and when they please.

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Etosha in July

Full sunshine is the default weather forecast, with average highs of 27°C and lows of 6°C (it can and does occasionally hit 0°C). We’re now in peak season, and waterholes will be well attended by both big game and tourists! This means the central part of the park is optimum turf, and game viewing wherever there is a water source is extremely rewarding. Booking in advance is essential.

Etosha in July

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Full sunshine is the default weather forecast, with average highs of 27°C and lows of 6°C (it can and does occasionally hit 0°C). We’re now in peak season, and waterholes will be well attended by both big game and tourists! This means the central part of the park is optimum turf, and game viewing wherever there is a water source is extremely rewarding. Booking in advance is essential.

Etosha in August

Peak season in terms of weather, international tourist numbers and waterhole action. August seldom sees a drop of rain, and average temperatures are rising: highs are 31° and lows 11°. It will be busy enough in the park for those allergic to crowds to consider staying in a lodge on a private reserve outside the park borders, or look to the less-visited Western side of the park. Acacia nebrownii trees flower by the hundred in August and September, each tree bearing “hundreds of…

Etosha in August

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Peak season in terms of weather, international tourist numbers and waterhole action. August seldom sees a drop of rain, and average temperatures are rising: highs are 31° and lows 11°. It will be busy enough in the park for those allergic to crowds to consider staying in a lodge on a private reserve outside the park borders, or look to the less-visited Western side of the park. Acacia nebrownii trees flower by the hundred in August and September, each tree bearing “hundreds of thousands of yellow flowers that give off a lovely scent,” says wildlife photographer Mario Fazekas.

Etosha in September

Still prime dry season game viewing time. Days are hot. Average highs are around 35°C, although a warm jacket may still be welcome on early morning game drives and when the sun goes down, believe it or not. It’s still peak season for Etosha for the first part of the month, and there will be traffic and some congestion at prime waterholes, which will be seeing all the big game action. The central section of the park will be buzzing. Not the African experience you imagined? Consider…

Etosha in September

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Still prime dry season game viewing time. Days are hot. Average highs are around 35°C, although a warm jacket may still be welcome on early morning game drives and when the sun goes down, believe it or not. It’s still peak season for Etosha for the first part of the month, and there will be traffic and some congestion at prime waterholes, which will be seeing all the big game action. The central section of the park will be buzzing. Not the African experience you imagined? Consider a lodge in a neighbouring private reserve and dip into the park itself as required.

Etosha in October

One of the hottest months of the year, with high temperatures averaging 37°C. You’ll be able to tell it’s really warm when you see the tiny dik-dik breathing rapidly: it has an enlarged internal nasal area with lots of blood vessels and ‘nasal panting’ helps cool it down (elephants flap their enormous ears to do the same thing). Happily, humans have iced drinks! Visitor numbers tend to be high to moderate this month (it quietens down). As with August and September, herds are…

Etosha in October

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One of the hottest months of the year, with high temperatures averaging 37°C. You’ll be able to tell it’s really warm when you see the tiny dik-dik breathing rapidly: it has an enlarged internal nasal area with lots of blood vessels and ‘nasal panting’ helps cool it down (elephants flap their enormous ears to do the same thing). Happily, humans have iced drinks! Visitor numbers tend to be high to moderate this month (it quietens down). As with August and September, herds are plentiful in the central areas. If pressed for time, this is the place to go and one need not visit the eastern or western sides. There should be some showers this month, but it’s not guaranteed.

Etosha in November

One of the hottest months of the year, when average temperatures spike: it’s 35° to over 40°. November is the real start of the annual rainy season. Once showers have drenched the thirsty land, vegetation springs to life – giving herbivores the chance to move into new areas to feed and become less dependent on the waterholes. November is somewhat of a ‘shoulder’ season though and visitors will see animals, fear not. This is the month that sees most cloud cover (fully…

Etosha in November

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One of the hottest months of the year, when average temperatures spike: it’s 35° to over 40°. November is the real start of the annual rainy season. Once showers have drenched the thirsty land, vegetation springs to life – giving herbivores the chance to move into new areas to feed and become less dependent on the waterholes. November is somewhat of a ‘shoulder’ season though and visitors will see animals, fear not. This is the month that sees most cloud cover (fully overcast days), yet that averages only five to six days. Much of the rainy season is partly cloudy, with rain in the afternoons as opposed to set-in rain.

Etosha in December

The rains should have arrived, and the game will be moving east to browse in the Namutoni area and further north, beyond the road network. The central waterholes quieten down and will no longer be visited much by elephant; rhino, too, may take some seeking out. Baby animals are born and shiver into action, able to walk in no time, but vulnerable for the first few days after birth. Visitor numbers soar in mid to late December as local holidays kick in. Book way in advance if you hope…

Etosha in December

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The rains should have arrived, and the game will be moving east to browse in the Namutoni area and further north, beyond the road network. The central waterholes quieten down and will no longer be visited much by elephant; rhino, too, may take some seeking out.

Baby animals are born and shiver into action, able to walk in no time, but vulnerable for the first few days after birth. Visitor numbers soar in mid to late December as local holidays kick in. Book way in advance if you hope to travel at this time, for all accommodations inside and outside the park. Large family parties will be setting up camp in the park with everything including a kitchen sink and buzzing about in search of predators; if the crowds will intrude on the experience, choose another time. Average temperatures have cooled a bit with rains, but still average 35°. Intra-African and Palearctic migrant bird species should be here, an enormous plus for birders.

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Tours in Etosha

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Our Destination Expert

Alice Lombard Alice Lombard Alice Lombard Alice Lombard Alice Lombard Alice Lombard

Meet the Team

Alice Lombard

Alice is Discover Africa’s Sales & Product Manager, responsible for managing the Discover Africa Sales Consultants as well as all the products and itineraries that we promote.

About Alice

What does Alice love about African travel?

The people, the culture, the diverse scenery, the wildlife and of course the food & wine.

What African countries have you travelled to?

Zimbabwe (Victoria Falls), Botswana (Okavango Delta, Linyanti, Chobe), Namibia (Southern), Zanzibar, Kenya (Mombasa and Malindi), Mauritius and South Africa.

What is Alice’s favourite place in Africa?

Victoria Falls and Cape Town.

Contact Discover Africa

Send us a message, to ask any questions, or request a tailor-made safari or experience.

Call Discover Africa on +27 (0)21 422 3498

Get in touch to find out more about the tours on offer or request a personalized no-obligations quote.

Megan Warrington Megan Warrington Megan Warrington Megan Warrington Megan Warrington Megan Warrington

Meet the Team

Megan Warrington

Megan is an Africa Concierge Expert at Discover Africa, she is responsible for compiling travel programs for people in search of their dream safari in Africa.

About Megan

What does Megan love about African travel?

There is always a new adventure around the next corner.

What African countries have you travelled to?

South Africa, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Lesotho, Botswana and Tanzania.

What is Megan’s favourite place in Africa?

Namibia

Contact Discover Africa

Send us a message, to ask any questions, or request a tailor-made safari or experience.

Call Discover Africa on +27 (0)21 422 3498

Get in touch to find out more about the tours on offer or request a personalized no-obligations quote.

Alice Lombard Alice Lombard Alice Lombard Alice Lombard Alice Lombard Alice Lombard

Meet the Team

Alice Lombard

Alice is Discover Africa’s Sales & Product Manager, responsible for managing the Discover Africa Sales Consultants as well as all the products and itineraries that we promote.

About Alice

What does Alice love about African travel?

The people, the culture, the diverse scenery, the wildlife and of course the food & wine.

What African countries have you travelled to?

Zimbabwe (Victoria Falls), Botswana (Okavango Delta, Linyanti, Chobe), Namibia (Southern), Zanzibar, Kenya (Mombasa and Malindi), Mauritius and South Africa.

What is Alice’s favourite place in Africa?

Victoria Falls and Cape Town.

Contact Discover Africa

Send us a message, to ask any questions, or request a tailor-made safari or experience.

Call Discover Africa on +27 (0)21 422 3498

Get in touch to find out more about the tours on offer or request a personalized no-obligations quote.

Matthys van Aswegen Matthys van Aswegen Matthys van Aswegen Matthys van Aswegen Matthys van Aswegen Matthys van Aswegen

Meet the Team

Matthys van Aswegen

Matthys is Discover Africa’s Senior Travel Consultant, with over 13 years experience in the travel industry and a keen eye for photography.

About Matthys

What does Matthys love about African travel?

Diversity and abundance of landscapes, cultures, wildlife, beaches, food and everything you can think of.

What African countries have you travelled to?

South Africa, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mauritius and Tanzania.

What is Matthys’s favourite place in Africa?

Cape Town

Contact Discover Africa

Send us a message, to ask any questions, or request a tailor-made safari or experience.

Call Discover Africa on +27 (0)21 422 3498

Get in touch to find out more about the tours on offer or request a personalized no-obligations quote.

Adelle Bell Adelle Bell Adelle Bell Adelle Bell Adelle Bell Adelle Bell

Meet the Team

Adelle Bell

Adelle is Discover Africa’s Senior Travel Consultant and has been in the travel industry for the past 10 years. She is a FIT specialist and has extensive experience in planning and executing dream itineraries in luxury travel.

About Adelle

What does Adelle love about African travel?

You have not lived if you have not experienced an African Safari - the early morning safari drives with the African sun rising in the distance, the smell of morning freshness, coffee in the Bush. You have got to experience a morning in Africa!

What African countries have you travelled to?

South Africa (Kruger National Park, Sabi Sands and Phinda Game Reserve), Botswana and Mozambique.

What is Adelle’s favourite place in Africa?

Kruger National Park

Contact Discover Africa

Send us a message, to ask any questions, or request a tailor-made safari or experience.

Call Discover Africa on +27 (0)21 422 3498

Get in touch to find out more about the tours on offer or request a personalized no-obligations quote.

Antoinette Van Heerden Antoinette Van Heerden Antoinette Van Heerden Antoinette Van Heerden Antoinette Van Heerden Antoinette Van Heerden

Meet the Team

Antoinette Van Heerden

Antionette is a Travel Consultant at Discover Africa, with 5 + years experience in the travel and tourism industry. She specializes in luxury safari packages.

About Antoinette

What does Antoinette love about African travel?

Adventure combined leisure travel makes for the best trip!

What African countries have you travelled to?

South Africa, Botswana, Namibia and Zimbabwe.

What is Antoinette’s favourite place in Africa?

South Africa, Botswana and Namibia.

Contact Discover Africa

Send us a message, to ask any questions, or request a tailor-made safari or experience.

Call Discover Africa on +27 (0)21 422 3498

Get in touch to find out more about the tours on offer or request a personalized no-obligations quote.

Superb safari and well organised

Geoffrey Burton

18 Jun 2015

Excellent tailor-made family trip to Namibia

Paolo

06 Jul 2018

Helpful travel coordinator planned the perfect trip

Tyler

14 Jan 2019

Breathe taking, exclusive, unforgettable

Sheila

19 Jun 2015

Exceptional Africa trip

Jon Nafziger

19 Jun 2017

Excellent Company and Staff

Terry Knott

20 Jan 2017

Exceeded our expectations.

Stella

05 Jun 2019

Exceptional Africa trip

Jon Nafziger

19 Jun 2017

We are definitely using Discover Africa again. Thank you for our trip

Verkijk Family

01 Dec 2010

With Discover Africa I had the most wonderful experience of my life

Debby

05 Jun 2015

Thank you Ellena for your professional service

Dirk Van Den Berg

01 Feb 2013

Registered Members of these Organizations